Over 60 Words to Describe Your Ancestor's Hair

60+ words to describe your ancestor's hair  #genealogy #writingtips #familyhistory


In previous posts, we've discussed the importance of writing about your ancestor's physical appearance and how to find details about their physique, if you don't have photos to aid your writing. Today, let's give you a quick list of adjectives that can help you describe your ancestor's hair color and style if perhaps you have a photo to draw inspiration from.




Hair color is the easiest to assess in color photographs. It's more challenging in black and white images. Pick the adjectives that best create a mental picture for you.

Hair Color
blonde
strawberry blonde
golden blonde
mousy
ash brown
brunette
jet black
salt and pepper
ebony
raven
flaxen
tawny
chestnut
russet
sandy
auburn
copper
silver
snowy
sooty black

Hair texture is often overlooked but an essential aspect of describing hair. Be sure to use one of these words to narrow down what type of hair your ancestor had, or didn't have:


Hair Texture
Bald
Wispy
Fuzzy
Wavy
Frizzy
Wild
Untamed
Unmanageable
Straight
Scraggly
Spiky
Stiff
Buzzed
Shaved
Parted
Neatly-combed
Cascading
Close-cropped
Bristly
Receding


Finally, the style in which your ancestor wore their hair is the crowning glory of a physical description. Give these words a try:


Hair Style
Bouffant
Braids
Bun
Twist
Bob
Ringlets
Flip
Cornrows
Buzz
Layered
Feathered
Gelled
Slicked down
5-Point Cut
Pixie
Buster Brown
Mop Tops
Pompadour
Chignons
Bedford Crop


What do you think? Will any of these words fit to describe the locks on your ancestor's head? Did I miss any words that you've used? Let me know in the comments.

The important thing to remember when describing you ancestor is to do your best to help paint a picture for your readers. If someone disagrees with your word choice, tell them to go write their own story!


60 words (and counting) to describe your ancestor's hair color, cut and texture #genealogy #writingtips #familyhistory
Photos on this page courtesy of
Creative Commons c
ontributor simpleinsomnia


14 comments:

  1. Great cheat sheet. It is so important to make the description interesting to keep attention. Blue eyes, brown hair, 6ft tall is so boring. He was tall, barely over 6 feet, with blue-grey eyes that were surrounded with laugh lines, and had red unruly hair that forever popped up in a cowlick on top no matter how much grease he applied to his head. That is much more interesting to read.

    Enjoyed your blog.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ooh. You're good. Nicely done. I like the laugh lines addition.

      Delete
  2. A fascinating tutorial on how to describe more closely our ancestors’ appearance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So glad you liked it. I tried to add something a little interesting. Next week I'll describe another and stay and ill dhsre another characteristic.

      Delete
  3. Oooooo.. nice. I looked those up.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcelling

    Shingled is a great term for a cut similar to a bob. Wow. Great, fantastic words. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  4. My mom always described her hair as black as coal, because in the sunlight it looked blue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's amazing! It's not only a great description, but it is a personal account. Thanks for sharing.

      Delete
  5. Great suggestions, Devon Noel! I always liked the way Nancy Drew was described as having "titian blonde" hair. That description has stuck with me for 40-some years, believe it or not! :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep... and the younglings will remember the favorite scar of a dark haired boy with glasses from England.

      Delete
  6. And let's not forget the hair of the Baby Boomer generation. We let our freak flags fly!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I would never have thought up all those descriptive terms, so thank you for these aids in writing about our ancestors.

    ReplyDelete
  8. You're welcome. Be sure to see the list on facial features and more on the coming weeks

    ReplyDelete

Powered by Blogger.